headfirstintowonderland:

so someone once called my old english teacher immature (because at this point he was spinning around on a wheely chair) and he said:

“Yeah, but the truth is we never really grow up. We just masquerade as adults because that’s what we’re expected to do.”


and to this day that is the single most profound thing i have ever heard uttered by someone dicking around on a swivel chair

danteogodofsoup:

theysayimpsychodiaries:

marrymepizza:

Chimamanda Adichie - The Danger of a Single Story (TED Talks 2009)

Tell me again, what did you say about representation not being important?

Both fascinating and scary…

aoroen:

by oki

aoroen:

by oki

Some claim that Evolution is just a theory, as if it were merely an opinion.

melvillehouse:

openbookstore:

Lizzy Recommends: The Weirdness by Jeremy Bushnell, published by melvillehouse
I was extremely excited to read this book— a blurb comparing it to Good Omens sold me on it to the point I didn’t need to hear anything else— and from that comparison I would have (accurately) guessed it would be clever, funny, and an occasionally biting satire. I’d have guessed it’d have some thoughts on human nature to chew on. I’ll admit, though, that I didn’t expect it to surprise me.
The Weirdness totally surprised me in all the best ways.
William Harrison Ridgeway— though he prefers Billy— is a young Brooklynite f***-up of the type we see so often in literature these days. He’s on a path of failing to be a writer, failing to be a good son, failing to be a good friend and boyfriend, and growing slowly disillusioned with his life and dreams. Then he wakes up extremely hungover to find Lucifer Morningstar in his apartment with an offer (and some amazing coffee. And a power-point presentation). 
And then things happen and the things that happen are not the things that you’ll expect to happen. I want to describe each of the best parts, but I can’t bring myself to even give hints that could ruin it for you. I will say: The Weirdness is simultaneously the most perfect skewering of the overly-pretentious literary scene and the most perfect skewering of trite genre tropes, and I was cackling with delight for the entire book. (I even snuck away to read part of it at work- let’s pretend that my manager isn’t reading this. LOOK AWAY, KEVIN.)
This is one of those books where I wish it could have been longer, just to prolong the experience of reading it. A must read!
(P.S. Lucifer is my favorite, Lucifer is always my favorite, please more Lucifer in literature. K thanks!)

THIS THIS THIS. Reviewers are saying this. Booksellers are saying this. I’m saying this. This book will surprise you. It has more, so much more to offer than you could ever have expected. Take a chance on it.

melvillehouse:

openbookstore:

Lizzy Recommends: The Weirdness by Jeremy Bushnell, published by melvillehouse

I was extremely excited to read this book— a blurb comparing it to Good Omens sold me on it to the point I didn’t need to hear anything else— and from that comparison I would have (accurately) guessed it would be clever, funny, and an occasionally biting satire. I’d have guessed it’d have some thoughts on human nature to chew on. I’ll admit, though, that I didn’t expect it to surprise me.

The Weirdness totally surprised me in all the best ways.

William Harrison Ridgeway— though he prefers Billy— is a young Brooklynite f***-up of the type we see so often in literature these days. He’s on a path of failing to be a writer, failing to be a good son, failing to be a good friend and boyfriend, and growing slowly disillusioned with his life and dreams. Then he wakes up extremely hungover to find Lucifer Morningstar in his apartment with an offer (and some amazing coffee. And a power-point presentation). 

And then things happen and the things that happen are not the things that you’ll expect to happen. I want to describe each of the best parts, but I can’t bring myself to even give hints that could ruin it for you. I will say: The Weirdness is simultaneously the most perfect skewering of the overly-pretentious literary scene and the most perfect skewering of trite genre tropes, and I was cackling with delight for the entire book. (I even snuck away to read part of it at work- let’s pretend that my manager isn’t reading this. LOOK AWAY, KEVIN.)

This is one of those books where I wish it could have been longer, just to prolong the experience of reading it. A must read!

(P.S. Lucifer is my favorite, Lucifer is always my favorite, please more Lucifer in literature. K thanks!)

THIS THIS THIS. Reviewers are saying this. Booksellers are saying this. I’m saying this. This book will surprise you. It has more, so much more to offer than you could ever have expected. Take a chance on it.

o-dawgtheinvincible:

sigmarikz:

certaflyably:

thirstingaintdead:

Top 3 phrases that’ll create sexual tension

  1. "Make me",
  2. "oh really",
  3. "is that so"

"prove it"

"What’s in it for me?"

"The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated 75 to 200 million people and peaking in Europe in the years 1348–50 CE."

ewilloughby:


Voracious birders tend to look for birds wherever they go, and that includes in fictional sources. For a serious birder, a movie bird is just as much of an opportunity to exercise the ID skills as a legitimate birding trip is. Over the years, movies and video games have included an embarrassing share of “generic” birds that aren’t much of anything: usually a boring small passerine, often monochrome. However, a handful of well-known birds in popular culture are probably based on actual species, though it sometimes takes some considerable inference to figure out exactly what. So here is Jon’s and my list of Top 10 Fictional Birds Based on Real Birds, in chronological order.



1. Eagles of Manwë from The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit: Golden eagle (first appearance: 1937)



These giant, mysterious, immensely powerful birds of prey are a sort of deus ex machina in the Middle Earth world, always showing up at exactly the right moment. While they are clearly not actually supposed to be golden eagles - they are much larger, sentient, and exist in a fantasy universe - they are probably based on them. One of the first renditions of the giant birds was painted by Tolkien himself and appeared with the original version of The Hobbit. This illustration clearly resembles a golden eagle, and according to Tolkien’s son Christopher, the painting was based on a picture of an immature golden eagle by Archilbald Thorburn. With a bit of digging, we found the original painting.
—> Read more on my blog! —>

ewilloughby:

Voracious birders tend to look for birds wherever they go, and that includes in fictional sources. For a serious birder, a movie bird is just as much of an opportunity to exercise the ID skills as a legitimate birding trip is. Over the years, movies and video games have included an embarrassing share of “generic” birds that aren’t much of anything: usually a boring small passerine, often monochrome. However, a handful of well-known birds in popular culture are probably based on actual species, though it sometimes takes some considerable inference to figure out exactly what. So here is Jon’s and my list of Top 10 Fictional Birds Based on Real Birds, in chronological order.

1. Eagles of Manwë from The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit: Golden eagle (first appearance: 1937)

These giant, mysterious, immensely powerful birds of prey are a sort of deus ex machina in the Middle Earth world, always showing up at exactly the right moment. While they are clearly not actually supposed to be golden eagles - they are much larger, sentient, and exist in a fantasy universe - they are probably based on them. One of the first renditions of the giant birds was painted by Tolkien himself and appeared with the original version of The Hobbit. This illustration clearly resembles a golden eagle, and according to Tolkien’s son Christopher, the painting was based on a picture of an immature golden eagle by Archilbald Thorburn. With a bit of digging, we found the original painting.

—> Read more on my blog! —>

two-winchesters-and-castiel:

thelaughingwholock:

thelitanyofdee:

I can’t…..Omg…I can’t.


The sarcasm is strong with this one.


Yeah, we have a gif for that.

two-winchesters-and-castiel:

thelaughingwholock:

thelitanyofdee:

I can’t…..Omg…I can’t.

image

The sarcasm is strong with this one.

Yeah, we have a gif for that.