time-lord-vonnegut:

Scientific method.

prinzessinfantaghiro:

AU in which everyone in Westeros makes good life choices Part1/?

electricsed:

aliceismywonderland:

haleybaley901:

justkody:

pinkcupcake123:

Jacob’s Well - Wimberley, Texas

hey kids let’s all go jump into the pits of hell

This is the scariest thing I’ve ever seen.

People have actually died in Jacob’s Well, but not just from jumping, you’re too buoyant to really go down far.

But Jacob’s Well draws a lot of scuba divers, and some of them have gotten lost and run out of air. Some of the bodies have never even been found, because the underground river that feeds Jacob’s Well is so complex. I find that terrifying.

I’ve been there. You have to be careful because coming back up from too far and you get stuck under rocks trying to find the surface.

Wow look at that giant hole of NOPE.

buttercakesandteacafe:

somethingpointy:

somethingpointy:

somethingpointy:

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GUYS THERE IS A HEART IN MY FRIDGE, I WENT TO GO LOOK FOR SOMETHING TO SNACK ON AND I FIND A FUCKING HEART SARAN WRAPPED AND SITTING ON THE SHELF! WHY IS THERE A FUCKING HEART IN MY FRIDGE??????

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THIS ISN’T A FUCKING JOKE MAN

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THIS IS NOT A FUCKING JOKE

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LOOK AT THE FUCKING SIZE OF THIS THING IT BLED ALL  OVER ME

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WHAT IS WRONG WITH MY FAMILY I LIVE IN THE MIDDLE OF SEATTLE????

SO I LOOKED IN OUR FREEZER AND…

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Run.

drawnbydana:

The Red Viper.

Prints available here!

catsbeaversandducks:

America’s First Cat Café Opens: Drink Coffee Alongside Adorable Cats

Yesterday, America’s first cat café opened in New York City. Cat lovers, you now have only three more day to sip coffee and eat pastries alongside adorable cats! Purina One teamed up with the North Shore Animal League, the country’s largest no-kill shelter, to create this pop-up café that’s the temporary home to rescue cats. While the concept of a cat café has been around for a while, with Asia and Europe leading the way, this is the first time one has opened in the United States. Two permanent cat cafés are scheduled to open in San Francisco this year.

The concept is simple. Visitors pay an hourly fee or cover charge to sit and lounge with cats. This one, on 168 Bowery, is free. Sixteen cats roam the premises and you’re welcome to pick one up and snuggle with it. If you fall in love with a particular one, you can even adopt it! (Read about each individual cat, here. Looks like “Sushi” is featured in the photo, above.) To get your feline fix, stop by the store from 10a to 7p each day till April 27. If you’d like to learn a little something, you can listen to different cat experts talk about cat health and behavior. The store’s capacity is limited to just 65 people, so you may have to wait in line.

Via My Modern Met

lohrien:

Illustrations by Rebecca Yanovskaya website l tumblr

jtotheizzoe:


Tripedal to the Metal
That’s some loco motion, huh? Found this neat little GIF showing how an ant’s legs move at a full gallop. While calmly strolling though the picnic grounds, ants have five of their six legs at a time in contact with the ground. But when it’s time to put the (tiny) pedal to the metal, they change their gait to this alternating tripod motion.
This pattern isn’t controlled by the insect’s brain, but rather by bundles of neurons in the leg called central pattern generators. While moving at such a clip, it just so happens that three legs is the minimum number it needs on the ground at a time to balance its rigid exoskeleton without toppling over.
Is that part of the reason that insects have six legs and not another number like four or eight? Or did the gait evolve to match the hardware? My guess is the latter, but I am not sure. What say you, insect folks? 
(GIF via NC State University)

jtotheizzoe:

Tripedal to the Metal

That’s some loco motion, huh? Found this neat little GIF showing how an ant’s legs move at a full gallop. While calmly strolling though the picnic grounds, ants have five of their six legs at a time in contact with the ground. But when it’s time to put the (tiny) pedal to the metal, they change their gait to this alternating tripod motion.

This pattern isn’t controlled by the insect’s brain, but rather by bundles of neurons in the leg called central pattern generators. While moving at such a clip, it just so happens that three legs is the minimum number it needs on the ground at a time to balance its rigid exoskeleton without toppling over.

Is that part of the reason that insects have six legs and not another number like four or eight? Or did the gait evolve to match the hardware? My guess is the latter, but I am not sure. What say you, insect folks? 

(GIF via NC State University)